SNAP proposal is double whammy for many Minnesotans

The U.S. House is poised to vote next month on a proposal that would drastically cut basic food assistance to thousands of Minnesotans – including children, parents, seniors, people with disabilities and veterans.

The proposal would cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by $40 billion over 10 years, eliminating basic food assistance to at least 41,000 Minnesotans – many of whom are struggling to recover from the Great Recession. That’s in addition to a $5 billion cut to SNAP scheduled for this November.

According to our new analysis, Thousands of Minnesotans Would Lose Basic Food Support Under U.S. House Proposal, the proposal makes misguided changes to SNAP that amount to taking food off the tables of people who can’t find jobs or who are employed but aren’t earning enough to make ends meet.

The analysis points out that the majority of SNAP participants who are able to work do have jobs. They often don’t make enough to consistently feed their families, so SNAP bridges the gap. It enables people to buy healthy food that helps adults succeed in the workforce, children to focus in school, and seniors to have enough to eat to stay healthy.

The proposed cuts, along with the November cuts, are a double whammy that would increase hunger among Minnesotans who are struggling to put food on the table.

Fortunately, Minnesota’s Congressional Delegation can influence the outcome of this proposal. Our members of Congress need to hear from constituents counting on them to stop this idea. Please take a minute to call your representatives in Congress to let them know cutting SNAP and eliminating basic food assistance for 41,000 vulnerable Minnesotans is the wrong approach. Let them know that you’re counting on them to vote no and take leadership for more sensible solutions. This proposal is expected to move quickly in September, so be sure to make your calls this week!

-Caitlin Biegler and Leah Gardner

About Caitlin Biegler

Caitlin Biegler is the Minnesota Budget Project’s policy analyst. She researches and writes about state tax and budget issues. Caitlin holds a Master of Public Policy degree from George Washington University in Washington, DC; and a Bachelor of Science degree in Public Health from Tulane University in New Orleans, LA. She interned at the DC Fiscal Policy Institute in Washington, DC, Third Way in Washington, DC, Lutheran Social Services, and the Alabama State Office of Primary Care and Rural Health.
This entry was posted in Federal Budget, Poverty and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply